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Allergy Calendar

Want to know what allergens are in season?

Grass allergy

Grass

March to October

Grass pollen season begins in early March and doesn’t end until grasses stop releasing pollen in mid-October. As grass releases pollen into the air, the wind can carry it for miles on dry, sunny days. Pollen counts are usually lower on damp or cool days. Grass pollen is microscopic. Though you may not see it in the air, if you’re allergic to grass pollen, you may experience a reaction even to small amounts of it.

Pigweed Allergen

Pigweed

March to October

Pigweed is an annual herb that grows throughout the U.S. in agricultural fields and recently disturbed soils. Plants grow to 28 feet tall, and leaves are a dull green. The flowers are dense, and sometimes showy. In pollen counts, pigweed is often interchanged with the plant called lamb’s quarters (Chenopodium) for a few reasons. Flowering and pollen shed occurs at the same time and the pollen grains look the same to analysts conducting pollen counts through their microscopes. Common names for these plants are also used interchangeably depending on where you are in the country. Late summer to autumn is usually the peak time for the sparce pollen shed.

Ragweed allergen

Ragweed

August to November

According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, about 75% of Americans who have plant allergies are sensitive to ragweed. You’ll find common ragweed sprouting in the fields and roadsides, riverbanks, and throughout rural areas of Texas. Ragweed pollen season begins in mid-summer and continues through the middle of November. Species of ragweed account for most of the hay fever reactions experienced in the fall months. Symptoms include sneezing and runny nose, as well as itchy eyes.

Mold spores

Mold

Year Round

Molds are another year-round problem affecting allergy sufferers. Mold spores float in the air, much like pollen, increasing as temperatures rise in the Spring. Symptoms of a reaction to mold allergies include sneezing, itching, congestion, runny nose and dry, scaling skin. Mold spores may enter the nose and cause hay fever symptoms, or trigger asthma if they reach the lungs. Indoor molds and mildew need dampness, and thrive in basements, bathrooms or anywhere with a leaky water source.

Palm tree allergen

Palm

Year Round

Palm trees are a botanical family of perennial lianas, shrubs, and trees. They are the only members of the family Arecaceae, which is the only family in the order Arecales. They grow in hot climates.

Dust mite allergen

Dust Mite

Year Round

There’s no escaping dust mites – they’re a year-round problem all over the U.S. and the state of Texas. You’ll find them lurking in every corner of your house, behind the curtains, in your carpet, on your pets, and in your bed. Dust mite allergens are a common trigger of asthma symptoms and a major irritant for Texas allergy sufferers. Dust mites thrive in warm, humid environments such as bedding, upholstered furniture, and carpeting.

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Learn more about all the seasonal allergies below

Ash tree allergen

Ash

Box Elder

Box Elder

Cedar tree allergen

Cedar

Cottonwood Tree

Cottonwood

Dust mite allergen

Dust Mite

Elm tree allergen

Elm

Grass allergy

Grass

Juniper

Juniper

Lambsquarter

Lambsquarter

Mold spores

Mold

Mulberry tree allergen

Mulberry

Oak tree allergen

Oak

Palm tree allergen

Palm

Pecan tree allergen

Pecan

Pigweed Allergen

Pigweed

Pine tree allergen

Pine

Ragweed allergen

Ragweed

Sagebrush

Sagebrush